Groundbreaking for Central Steel & Wire Company in University Park

Groundbreaking for Central Steel & Wire Company in University Park

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Groundbreaking for Central Steel & Wire Company in University Park

It was a great day attended by many for the the new Central Steel & Wire Company headquarters and operation hub relocating to the Village of University Park from Chicago.

Central Steel & Wire Company Groundbreaking

The 900,000-sf building is located at Steger Road and Central Avenue and should be completed next spring.

Central Steel & Wire was founded in 1909. Ryerson, which employs about 3,900 people at about 100 industrial metal processing centers in North America, was founded in 1842 and acquired Central Steel & Wire in 2018.

Central Steel & Wire buys rolls of steel, aluminum, and other metals from mills, then processes and fabricates them into everything from structural I-beams used in construction to sheet metal used to make household appliances.

Ryerson CEO Eddie Lehner was on hand and spoke passionately about manufacturing here in the U.S. and the importance of creating family-wage manufacturing jobs. “The more we manufacture in this country and do it the way we’re going to do it in University Park, the more broad-based prosperity will increase.”

Doug Pryor, CEO and President of the Will County Center for Economic Development explained “They were looking at southeast Wisconsin – they were looking at northwest Indiana. It’s a huge win for Will County and makes a bold statement about our workforce and job creation successes.”

Central Steel will employ at least 300 people at the University Park center. Gateway 57 Business Park is being developed by Venture One Real Estate and CRG.

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Celebrating Jim Roolf’s Decades of Leadership

Celebrating Jim Roolf’s Decades of Leadership

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Celebrating Jim Roolf’s Decades of Leadership

Jim Roolf, a longtime member of the CED Board of Directors, past Chairman, and Frank Turk Jr. Award recipient, attended his final meeting as a regular member of the Board in May.

Ruth Colby-2022 CED Board Chair, Jim Roolf, Doug Pryor-CED President & CEO

Pictured: Ruth Colby-2022 CED Board Chair, Jim Roolf, Doug Pryor-CED President & CEO

Jim has represented First Midwest Bank (soon to be Old National Bank) for more than 20 years with the CED. With a clear vision of the economic development possibilities for Will County, Jim worked on or chaired many important committees, coalitions, and councils that helped move Will County forward. Among his many accomplishments Jim served on the Illinois Tollway Board at a critical time and helped lead the development of the long-promised I-355 extension, one of many important Will County projects for which Jim has been an essential catalyst.

Jim Roolf Speaking at Opening

Jim Roolf Speaking at Opening

Jim has been a fierce advocate for Will County and we are excited that he will continue to work with the CED through committees and working groups offering his experience, knowledge, and humor. Thank you, Jim, for being a strong leader and for all of your work to help the CED and Will County be more successful!

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Will County Center for Economic Development Awarded $400,000  Brownfields Assessment Grant by U.S. EPA

Will County Center for Economic Development Awarded $400,000 Brownfields Assessment Grant by U.S. EPA

In the news

Will County Center for Economic Development Awarded $400,000
Brownfields Assessment Grant by U.S. EPA

Joliet riverfront view

The Will County Center for Economic Development is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a $400,000 Brownfields Assessment grant from the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

This grant provides funding to identify sites and conduct a range of planning activities, develop site specific clean-up plans, and community outreach related to brownfield sites with an emphasis on the Des Plaines River corridor in Will County. Brownfield sites are those contaminated by hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants. Once remediated, former brownfield properties can be redeveloped into a variety productive uses.

“Turning vacant or underutilized spaces into thriving community hubs is one of the cornerstones of our Rebuild Illinois infrastructure plan, and I’m pleased to see the Biden Administration provide funding for brownfields revitalization in Will County,” said Governor JB Pritzker. “This support marks another milestone in our journey to advance educational, environmental, economic and health justice for all Illinois residents.”

“Thank you to the U.S. EPA for providing the opportunity and funding for Will County to assess areas of environmental concern,” said Doug Pryor, President and CEO of Will County Center for Economic Development. “This grant will serve as a catalyst for needed cleanup and create opportunities for new growth in long disinvested areas of Will County. This work will help promote private investment, create jobs, and encourage growth in the County’s communities.”

The Center for Economic Development worked closely with the communities of Joliet, Lockport, and Rockdale and the County of Will through the application process. These communities helped develop an outstanding case highlighting Will County’s need to address the environmental and human health issues in brownfield areas.

“This grant is an important first step in empowering community-focused development in these neglected areas,” said Will County Executive Jennifer Bertino-Tarrant. “By eliminating blight and reducing the risk of environmental contamination in this region, we are supporting greener, healthier neighborhoods, as well as needed economic development.”

“We are looking forward to utilizing this opportunity to create positive outcomes for Joliet by removing environmental barriers to growth and opportunity,” added Joliet Mayor Bob O’Dekirk. “Thank you to the Center for Economic Development and United States Environmental Protection Agency Region V for your partnership.”

“Many brownfield sites across the country are in ‘downtown’ areas revealing that cities and towns were often built up in conjunction with one another. These vacated industrial sites are in prime, walkable locations where people live,” Lockport Mayor Steven Streit said. “There is wisdom in investing money to repurpose such brownfields. Restoring them back into functional places means there is one less bit of prime farmland being over-turned for new development on the far edge of town. Building back walkable, thriving communities where people both live AND work is the blueprint of civilizations since settlements first began. I applaud our lawmakers for making funds available to assist in the cleanup of these strategic places.”

“I would like to thank U.S. EPA for the $400,000 of funding for the Brownfield Assessment grant for the Village of Rockdale and our neighboring communities,” said Sam Wyke, Mayor of Rockdale. “Investment in brownfields programs in communities like Rockdale has had a positive impact throughout the nation. Our community was settled by workers of companies and businesses involved with heavy industries that provided many jobs. Now, most of the industrial sites have been vacant or underutilized for several generations. We need to determine the unrealized potential and opportunities of the unused industrial sites. Turning polluted properties back into productive real estate will help us bring the jobs back to our Village. The grant will improve public health and safety and will also increase the tax base.”

For more information on the Environmental Protection Agency or Brownfield Assessment Grants, please visit https://www.epa.gov/brownfields/brownfields-assessment-grants.

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Changing the narrative: Out-of-state businesses are buying Illinois’ sales pitch

Changing the narrative: Out-of-state businesses are buying Illinois’ sales pitch

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“Sometimes we don’t appreciate what we have here,” said Dan Seals, the CEO of Intersect Illinois.

Orrin Schwarz
DailyHerald.com

Dan Seals Intersect Illinois

If you’re someone who thinks Illinois gets everything wrong when it comes to business, this column isn’t for you.

Actually, maybe it is especially for you.

Maybe before you scream “Get me outta this $%^& state!!!” again, you should read what Dan Seals says to out-of-state businesses when he tells them, you should be in Illinois.

“Sometimes we don’t appreciate what we have here,” said Seals, the CEO of economic development organization Intersect Illinois, a public-private partnership between state government and many of the leading companies in the state. “And maybe it’s a grass-is-always-greener sort of dynamic, but I meet a lot of people who are doing well but think they’re the only ones who are doing well. And it just surprises me that there is such a wide gap between how we perceive ourselves and what the reality actually is here as far as our business environment is concerned.

“You don’t get an economy this big, you don’t get one this diverse and you don’t get companies that large all here by having a bad business environment. That’s illogical. And so I wish we could get more Illinoisans to be those kinds of ambassadors for what we have here and help me tell that story.”

Out-of-state companies are paying close attention to Seals’ marketing spiel. Maybe you should too.

Read the full story at:
DailyHerald.com

Current News

Study finds Will County airports produce major economic impact

Study finds Will County airports produce major economic impact

In the news

Study finds Will County airports produce major economic impact

The Joliet Park District has increased fuel prices at Joliet Regional Airport, where rental rates for hangar space increased Wednesday.

BY ALEX ORTIZ – AORTIZ@SHAWMEDIA.COM
SHAWMEDIA.COM

Three airports in Will County accounted for more than $140 million in economic impact and supported the creation of almost 800 jobs, according to a recent study.

The Illinois Department of Transportation conducted the study to assess the economic and social contributions of Illinois airports to the state economy, according to a description of the report that was published earlier this year. The analysis included data collected in 2019, according to the study.

The Illinois Aviation Economic Impact Analysis captured both quantitative economic impacts and community benefits through case studies.

The study looked at 85 airports, which included 12 providing commercial service and 73 that are focused only on general aviation.

Commercial service airports accommodate a large assortment of passenger jets. General aviation airports typically offer different sets of facilities that accommodate diverse types of aircraft and wide range of users, according to the report.

Among the airports analyzed were Bolingbrook’s Clow International Airport, the Lewis University Airport in Romeoville and the Joliet Regional Airport. The study examined two main areas, on-airport activity and visitor spending.

The Joliet Regional Airport accounted for $15 million in total economic impact. That included just more than $2 million in direct visitor spending.

The Joliet airport supported the creation of 82 jobs, according to the report.

Bolingbrook’s Clow Airport produced $34 million in economic impact.

That included $4.4 million in direct visitor spending.

The Bolingbrook airport supported the creation of 194 jobs, according to the report.

Lewis University Airport in Romeoville accounted for more than $92 million in total economic impact.

That also included $18.3 million in direct visitor spending.

The Romeoville airport supported the creation of 518 jobs, according to the report.

In total across the state, airports have produced almost half a million full and part-time jobs, more than $32 billion in labor income, and more than $53 billion in economic productivity.

To learn about the airport impact study, visit ilaviation.com.

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